Yahwah is God's name

This topic contains 22 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Sébastien Côté 2 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #101264
     MichaelTheeArchAngel 
    Member
    • Topics started 22
    • Total replies 114

    Yahwah is God’s personal name based upon the ancient Semitic language. Take note that the letter ו in Biblical Hebrew was known as waw and pronounced as w, as in Yhwh, “Yahwah.” In Modern Hebrew ו is known as vav and pronounced as v. The derivation of Yahwah is from the ancient Semitic words HaYah and HaWah. HaYah means “The Life or The Living.” HaWah means “The Beginning or The happening.” This is a partial list of words associated HaWah: Be, is, was, became, happened and appeared.

    This scripture here is an example of how it would read if translated into English.

    Yahwah reveals His name to Moses
    Exodus 3:13-15. 13 And Moses said to Elohiym, “Suppose I go to the siblings of the Israelites and say to them, 'The Elohiym of your forefathers has sent me to you,' and they ask me, 'What is His name?' What shall I say to them?” (Elohiym means, “God of The Living.” It can also be translated as “god-s of the living” or “god-s of life,” for those who have life immortal.) 14 And Elohiym said to Moses, “The Living that Lives.” This is what you are to say to the Israelites: “The Living has sent me to you.” (HaYah) in the ancient Semitic language means: The Living, or The Life.) 15 And Elohiym also said to Moses, “Say to the Israelites, Yahwah, the Elohiym of your forefathers; the Elohiym of Abraham, the Elohiym of Isaac and the Elohiym of Jacob has sent me to you.' That’s my name forever, the name by which I’m to be remembered, from generation to generation.”

    Deuteronomy 6:4. 4 Hear, O Israel: Yahwah our Elohiym, Yahwah is only.

    Psalm 66:4. All the earth bows down to you; they sing praise to you, they sing praise to your name.” Selah. (Selah means to pause and consider.)

    Psalms 83:16-18. 16 Cover their faces with shame so that men will seek your name, O Yahwah. 17 May they ever be ashamed and dismayed; may they perish in disgrace. 18 Let them know that you, whose name is Yahwah, that you alone are the Most High over all the earth.

    Isaiah 63:16. For you are our Father, though Abraham does not know us or Israel acknowledge us; you, Yahwah, are our Father; our Redeemer from old is your name.

    Isaiah 52:5-6. 5 And now what do I have here declares Yahwah? For my people have been taken away for nothing, and those who rule them mock, declares Yahwah. And all day long my name is constantly blasphemed. 6 Therefore my people will know my name; therefore in that day they will know that it is I who foretold it. Yes, it is I.

    Isaiah 42:8. I’m Yahwah; that’s my name! I will not give my glory to another…

    Jeremiah 15:16. When your words came, I ate them; they were my joy and my heart's delight, for I bear your name, Yahwah, Elohiym of Host.

    Joel 2:26-32. 26 You will have plenty to eat, until you are full, and you will praise the name of Yahwah your Elohiym, who has worked wonders for you; never again will my people be shamed. 27 Then you will know that I am in Israel, that I am Yahwah your Elohiym, and that there is no other; never again will my people be shamed. 28 “And afterward, I will pour out my Spirit on all people. Your sons and daughters will prophesy, your old men will dream dreams, your young men will see visions. 29 Even on my servants, both men and women, I will pour out my Spirit in those days. 30 I will show wonders in the heavens and on the earth, blood and fire and billows of smoke. 31 The sun will be turned to darkness and the moon to blood before the coming of the great and dreadful day of Yahwah. 32 And everyone who calls on the name of Yahwah will be saved; for on Mount Zion and in Jerusalem there will be deliverance, as Yahwah has said, among the survivors whom Yahwah calls.

    A brief history lesson

    After 300 B.C. Adonai became more frequently used than Yahwah. And the Books of Esther, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Solomon do not use the name Yahwah. The title “Lord” (Adonai) is usually a substitute for the divine name: Yahwah.
    Origen reported that when Jews read the name Yahwah, they would pronounce it Adonai, while non Jews would pronounce it Kurios.
    Later on, Christian scribes replaced the Hebrew characters in the Greek Bible with Kurios. Scribes translating the Hebrew Bible showed that Yahwah should not be pronounced, but read as Adonai by substituting the Hebrew vowels of Adonai for those of Yahwah when writing the divine name. Later on, readers who did not know this history did not pronounce Yahwah; but neither did they pronounce Adonai, as the scribes intended. As a result the Middle Ages readers of the Hebrew Bible began pronouncing precisely what was written, and the mixture of consonants from Yahwah and vowels from Adonai, producing the pronunciation of Jehovah, a word that never existed for speakers of ancient Hebrew.

    The word “Jehovah” comes from the fact that ancient Jewish texts used to put the vowels of the Name “Adonai” (the usual substitute for YHWH) with the consonants of YHWH to remind people not to pronounce YHWH as written. A sixteenth century German Christian scribe, while transliterating the Bible into Latin for the Pope, wrote the Name out as it appeared in his texts, with the consonants of YHWH and the vowels of Adonai, and came up with the word JeHoVah. In Hebrew the word Jahovah can be interpretated as “God's destructive evil desires.”

    The number of letters in the Hebrew alphabet, their order, their names, and their phonetic values are virtually identical to those of the Aramaic alphabet, as both Hebrews and Arameans borrowed the Phoenician alphabet for their uses during the end of the 2nd millennium BC. The modern script used for writing Hebrew (usually called the Jewish script by scholars, and also traditionally known as the square script, block script, or Assyrian script; not to be confused with the Eastern variant of the Syriac alphabet) evolved during the 3rd century BC from the Aramaic script, which was used by Jews for writing Hebrew since the 6th century BC. Prior to that, Hebrew was written using the old Hebrew script, which evolved from the 10th century BC Phoenician script.

    The original pictograph used in the Early Semitic script is a Y shape, a picture of a tent peg. The tent pegs were made of wood and may have been Y-shaped to prevent the rope from slipping off.

    The Modern Hebrew name for this letter is “vav”, a word meaning “peg” or “hook”. This letter is used in Modern Hebrew as a consonant with a “v” sound and as a vowel. If the Modern Hebrew letter appears as (וֹ), it is the vowel sound “ow” and if it appears as (וּ), it is the vowel sound “uw”. When used as a vowel the ancient pronunciation was also an “ow” or “uw”. In each consonant, vowel letters of the Ancient Hebrew language the pronunciation of the consonant is closely related to the pronunciation of the vowel such as the letter “hey” is “h” and “eh,” and the pronunciation of the letter “yud” is “y” and “iy”. For this reason, it is probable that the original pronunciation of the letter Y was with a “w”. In Modern and Ancient Arabic language, this letter is also pronounced with a “w”. Therefore, the original name of this letter would have been “waw” instead of “vav”.

    In regards to the consonant “W” in the name YHWH

    Wāw serves several functions in the Arabic language. Perhaps foremost among them is that it is the primary conjunction in Arabic, equivalent to “and”; it is usually prefixed to other conjunctions, such as ولكن wa-lakin, meaning “but”. Another function is the “oath“, by preceding a noun of great significantly valued by the speaker. It is often literally translatable to “By…” or “I swear to…”, and is often used in the
    Qur'an in this way, and also in the generally fixed construction والله wallah (“By Allah!” or “I swear to God!”).

    An oath (from Anglo-Saxon āð, also called plight) is either a promise or a statement of fact calling upon something or someone that the oath maker considers sacred, usually a god, as a witness to the binding nature of the promise or the truth of the statement of fact.

    Chapter 69 of Enoch

    This requested Michael, to show him the hidden name that he might enunciate it in the oath, so that those might quake before that name and oath who revealed all that was in secret to the children of men. And this is the power of this oath, for it is powerful and strong, and he placed this oath (Akae) in the hand of Michael. (Akae) is not a word, it is most likely an authors note, it could mean, “Also Known As Elohiym” or “Also Known As Eagle.” Michael’s seal could be the double winged eagle found in the Dead Sea Scrolls. The four winged Cherubim in Ezekiel may also have a relationship.

    #101266
     MichaelTheeArchAngel 
    Member
    • Topics started 22
    • Total replies 114

    The Hovah part of Je-hovah means RUIN and MISCHIEF in Hebrew, according to Strong's Concordance #1943. Hovah is another form form #1942; RUIN and MISCHIEF.

    #101267
     david 
    Participant
    • Topics started 68
    • Total replies 11,300

    The Codex Leningrad B 19A, of the 11th century C.E., vowel points the Tetragrammaton to read Yehwah′, Yehwih′, and Yeho·wah′.

    Ginsburg’s edition of the Masoretic text vowel points the divine name to read Yeho·wah′. (Ge 3:14, ftn)

    Hebrew scholars generally favor “Yahweh” as the most likely pronunciation. They point out that the abbreviated form of the name is Yah (Jah in the Latinized form), as at Psalm 89:8 and in the expression Ha·lelu-Yah′ (meaning “Praise Jah, you people!”). (Ps 104:35; 150:1, 6)

    Also, the forms Yehoh′, Yoh, Yah, and Ya′hu, found in the Hebrew spelling of the names Jehoshaphat, Joshaphat, Shephatiah, and others, can all be derived from Yahweh. Greek transliterations of the name by early Christian writers point in a somewhat similar direction with spellings such as I·a·be′ and I·a·ou·e′, which, as pronounced in Greek, resemble Yahweh. Still, there is by no means unanimity among scholars on the subject, some favoring yet other pronunciations, such as “Yahuwa,” “Yahuah,” or “Yehuah.”

    Since certainty of pronunciation is not now attainable, there seems to be no reason for abandoning in English the well-known form “Jehovah” in favor of some other suggested pronunciation.

    **If such a change were made, then, to be consistent, changes should be made in the spelling and pronunciation of a host of other names found in the Scriptures:
    Jeremiah would be changed to Yir·meyah′,
    Isaiah would become Yesha‛·ya′hu,
    Jesus would be either Yehoh·shu′a‛ (as in Hebrew) or I·e·sous′ (as in Greek).

    The purpose of words is to transmit thoughts; in English the name Jehovah identifies the true God, transmitting this thought more satisfactorily today than any of the suggested substitutes.

    #101268
     david 
    Participant
    • Topics started 68
    • Total replies 11,300

    Quote
    The Hovah part of Je-hovah means RUIN and MISCHIEF in Hebrew, according to Strong's Concordance #1943. Hovah is another form form #1942; RUIN and MISCHIEF.

    Except “Jehovah” isn't Hebrew.??

    So…

    It's like saying what does the “sus” part of Jesus mean? Jesus isn't a Hebrew name either.

    #101270
     david 
    Participant
    • Topics started 68
    • Total replies 11,300

    Do you know how Jesus’ family and friends addressed him in day-to-day conversation while he was growing up in Nazareth? The truth is, no human knows for certain, although it may have been something like Yeshua (or perhaps Yehoshua). It certainly was not Jesus.

    However, when the accounts of his life were written in the Greek language, the inspired writers did not try to preserve that original Hebrew pronunciation. Rather, they rendered the name in Greek, I·e·sous′. Today, it is rendered differently according to the language of the reader of the Bible. Spanish Bible readers encounter Jesús (pronounced Hes·soos′). Italians spell it Gesù (pronounced Djay·zoo′). And Germans spell it Jesus (pronounced Yay′soos).

    #101271
     MichaelTheeArchAngel 
    Member
    • Topics started 22
    • Total replies 114

    Quote (david @ Aug. 14 2008,10:23)

    Quote
    The Hovah part of Je-hovah means RUIN and MISCHIEF in Hebrew, according to Strong's Concordance #1943. Hovah is another form form #1942; RUIN and MISCHIEF.

    Except “Jehovah” isn't Hebrew.??

    So…

    It's like saying what does the “sus” part of Jesus mean?  Jesus isn't a Hebrew name either.


    Jah is a corruption of Yah in Hebrew. And Hovah is a Hebrew word for: The Hovah part of Je-hovah means RUIN and MISCHIEF in Hebrew, according to Strong's Concordance #1943. Hovah is another form form #1942; RUIN and MISCHIEF. SEE: STRONG'S CONCORDANCE.

    #101273
     david 
    Participant
    • Topics started 68
    • Total replies 11,300

    Quote
    And Hovah is a Hebrew word for: The Hovah part of Je-hovah means RUIN and MISCHIEF in Hebrew,

    Is Jehovah a Hebrew word Mike? No.

    #101277
     david 
    Participant
    • Topics started 68
    • Total replies 11,300

    I've been studying this for a while.

    These are some versions (transliterations and translations) of the divine name.

    YHVH YHWH Yahweh Yahveh Yaveh Yaweh Jehova Jehovah Jahova Jahovah Yahova Yahovah Yahowah Jahowa Jahowah Yahavah Jahavah Yahowe Yahoweh Jahaveh Jahaweh Yahaveh Yahaweh Jahuweh Yahuweh Jahuwah Yahuwah Yahuah Yah Jah Yahu Yahoo Yaohu Jahu Yahvah Jahvah Jahve Jahveh Yahve Yahwe Yauhu Yawhu Iahu Iahou Iahoo Iahueh

    Type one of them into google. See what it says.

    And of the son:

    Jeshua, Yeshua, Yeshuah, Yehshua, Yehshuah, Yeshouah, Y'shua, Y'shuah, Jeshu, Yeshu, Yehoshua, Yehoshuah, YHVHShua, YHVHShuah, Yhvhshua, Yhwhshua, YHWHShua, YHWHShuah, Yhvhshuah, Yhwhshuah, Yahvehshua, Yahwehshua, Yahvehshuah, Yahwehshuah, Yawhushua,Yahawshua, Jahshua, Jahshuah, Jahshuwah, Jahoshua, Jahoshuah, Jashua, Jashuah, Jehoshua, Jehoshuah, Yashua, Yashuah, Yahshua, Yahshuah, Yahushua, Yahushuah, Yahuahshua, Yahuahshuah, Yahoshua, Yahoshuah, Yaohushua, Yaohushuah, Yauhushua, Iahoshua, Iahoshuah, Iahushua, Iahushuah, YAHO-hoshu-WAH

    Many names of people and places mentioned in the Bible contain an abbreviated form of the divine name. Is it possible that these proper names can provide some clues as to how God’s name was pronounced?
    According to George Buchanan, professor emeritus at Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington, D.C., U.S.A., the answer is yes. Professor Buchanan explains: “In ancient times, parents often named their children after their deities. That means that they would have pronounced their children’s names the way the deity’s name was pronounced. The Tetragrammaton was used in people’s names, and they always used the middle vowel.”
    Consider a few examples of proper names found in the Bible that include a shortened form of God’s name. Jonathan, which appears as Yohnathań or Yehohnathań in the Hebrew Bible, means “Yaho or Yahowah has given,” says Professor Buchanan. The prophet Elijah’s name is ́Eliyah́ or ́Eliyáhu in Hebrew. According to Professor Buchanan, the name means: “My God is Yahoo or Yahoo-wah.” Similarly, the Hebrew name for Jehoshaphat is Yehoh-shaphat́, meaning “Yaho has judged.”
    A two-syllable pronunciation of the Tetragrammaton as “Yahweh” would not allow for the o vowel sound to exist as part of God’s name. But in the dozens of Biblical names that incorporate the divine name, this middle vowel sound appears in both the original and the shortened forms, as in Jehonathan and Jonathan. Thus, Professor Buchanan says regarding the divine name: “In no case is the vowel oo or oh omitted. The word was sometimes abbreviated as ‘Ya,’ but never as ‘Ya-weh.’ . . . When the Tetragrammaton was pronounced in one syllable it was ‘Yah’ or ‘Yo.’ When it was pronounced in three syllables it would have been ‘Yahowah’ or ‘Yahoowah.’ If it was ever abbreviated to two syllables it would have been ‘Yaho.’”—Biblical Archaeology Review.
    These comments help us understand the statement made by 19th-century Hebrew scholar Gesenius in his Hebrew and Chaldee Lexicon to the Old Testament Scriptures: “Those who consider that י?ה?ו?ה? [Ye-ho-wah] was the actual pronunciation [of God’s name] are not altogether without ground on which to defend their opinion. In this way can the abbreviated syllables י?ה?ו? [Ye-ho] and י?ו? [Yo], with which many proper names begin, be more satisfactorily explained.”
    In truth, scholars are by no means in agreement that the form “Yahweh” represents the original pronunciation.

    #101278
     MichaelTheeArchAngel 
    Member
    • Topics started 22
    • Total replies 114

    Quote (david @ Aug. 14 2008,10:45)

    Quote
    And Hovah is a Hebrew word for: The Hovah part of Je-hovah means RUIN and MISCHIEF in Hebrew,

    Is Jehovah a Hebrew word Mike?  No.


    It is a translation into English for the Hebrew.

    #101279
     david 
    Participant
    • Topics started 68
    • Total replies 11,300

    Right. So, it's not a Hebrew word then. We're agreed.

    #101281
     david 
    Participant
    • Topics started 68
    • Total replies 11,300

    Yahawah (Yahweh) may be the way this was originally pronounced in Hebrew.

    In Hebrew “hawah” means “becomes” and so his name means:

    “He causes to become.”

    ****

    Jesus name in Hebrew (maybe Yeshua or Yahshua or Yahashua) means: “Yahawah is salvation.)

    You can break down the parts of Yahashua into it's Hebrew components.

    But if you try to break down the parts of “Jesus” into Hebrew components, what are you doing?

    Something quite meaningless and perhaps deceptive.

    #101283
     MichaelTheeArchAngel 
    Member
    • Topics started 22
    • Total replies 114

    Quote (david @ Aug. 14 2008,11:05)
    Right.  So, it's not a Hebrew word then.  We're agreed.


    Because it is the wrong translation it makes God out to be evil. It is for those who wish to promote Dualism in scripture. That is why I do not like it. It makes God out to be evil. God is not Je-Ho-vah. God is Yah Wah.

    #101285
     david 
    Participant
    • Topics started 68
    • Total replies 11,300

    I'm thinking a better name for this thread should be: “Jehovah” isn't God's name.

    If you actually want to discuss why “Yahweh” is the preferred name of God among many scholars, then perhaps you should give your reasons. After all, this thread is called: “Yahweh is God's name.”

    Thus far, you haven't demonstrated why Yahweh is any better than any of these versions which have also been suggested by various scholars:

    Yahveh Yaveh Yaweh Jehova Jehovah Jahova Jahovah Yahova Yahovah Yahowah Jahowa Jahowah Yahavah Jahavah Yahowe Yahoweh Jahaveh Jahaweh Yahaveh Yahaweh Jahuweh Yahuweh Jahuwah Yahuwah Yahuah Yah Jah Yahu Yahoo Yaohu Jahu Yahvah Jahvah Jahve Jahveh Yahve Yahwe Yauhu

    It's true that most Hebrew scholars prefer Yahweh. But could you support why you believe this is the pronuciation?

    #101292
     MichaelTheeArchAngel 
    Member
    • Topics started 22
    • Total replies 114

    Quote (david @ Aug. 14 2008,11:15)
    Yahawah (Yahweh) may be the way this was originally pronounced in Hebrew.

    In Hebrew “hawah” means “becomes” and so his name means:

    “He causes to become.”

    ****

    Jesus name in Hebrew (maybe Yeshua or Yahshua or Yahashua) means: “Yahawah is salvation.)

    You can break down the parts of Yahashua into it's Hebrew components.

    But if you try to break down the parts of “Jesus” into Hebrew components, what are you doing?

    Something quite meaningless and perhaps deceptive.


    Did you read carefully the very first post? Yahwah means: Life Began. The translation I am giving you is the most ancient from the “semitic” language. Re-read the very first post. Hebrew is a mix of diffrent languages in that area of peoples.

    #101371
     MichaelTheeArchAngel 
    Member
    • Topics started 22
    • Total replies 114

    Because I am a Judaeo Christian, I do not believe in deforming God's Name or His Messiah, who is Yahshua. Nor do I believe in misleading people in knowing His name. And that is why you should listen to me before anybody else on the subject. Many people think or believe that they are Judaeo Christians, but are not. A Jew is a convert to Judaism, and before people were called Christians, they were called converts to Judaism.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

© 1999 - 2018 Heaven Net

or

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

or

Create Account